Maeve Glass

Associate Professor of Law

Maeve Glass

Maeve
Glass
Associate Professor of Law

Maeve Glass, Associate Professor of Law, is a legal historian of the United States. Her scholarship examines the development of constitutional law and its implications for today. She is currently completing her first book, These United States: The Fracturing of America. It is based on her Ph.D. dissertation, which won the American Society for Legal History's best dissertation prize in 2017. Glass has also published articles in the University of Chicago Law Review, Law and Social Inquiry, and the Columbia Human Rights Law Review.

Before her appointment to the faculty in 2018, Glass was an Academic Fellow at the Law School. She has also held fellowships in legal history at Harvard Law School and NYU Law. Glass has received awards from the American Society for Legal History for her work on the history of state citizenship as well as from the National Institute of Military Justice for her work on the history of military commissions.

A 2009 graduate of Columbia Law School, Glass was both a James Kent Scholar and Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar and received the E.B. Convers Prize for her work investigating federalism in the early Republic. She received her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2016, where she served as a contributing writer to the Princeton and Slavery Project and taught students in the American Studies Department and as a fellow at the Writing Center. Her teaching interests include constitutional law and history, the legal history of American slavery, and property.

 

Education
  • Ph.D., Princeton University, 2016
  • J.D., Columbia Law School, 2009
  • B.A., Yale University, 2004
Areas of Expertise
  • American legal history
  • Constitutional law and history
  • Federalism
Publications
  • “Citizens of the State,” The University of Chicago Law Review, 2018
  • “Bringing Back the States: A Congressional Perspective on the Fall of Slavery in America,” Law & Social Inquiry, 2014
  • “Explaining the Sioux Military Commission of 1862,” Columbia Human Rights Law Review, 2009

 

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Courses
Property
S. The Legal History of American Slavery