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By Ronald Mann
Yesterday’s opinion in Mission Product Holdings Inc. v. Tempnology, LLC resolved a long-standing disagreement in the lower courts about what happens when a debtor exercises its statutory right to reject a contract in bankruptcy. . . . Justice Elena Kagan’s opinion for the Supreme Court gives us a clear answer: Rejection breaches but does not rescind the contract in question.

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Ronald Mann Albert E. Cinelli Enterprise Professor of Law
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AARTI SHAHANI: Tim Wu figured Facebook would hire someone who was the opposite of Newstead.
TIM WU: I was a little shocked, taken aback.
SHAHANI: Wu, a law professor at Columbia University, once met the incoming Facebook lawyer at a party. They'd both clerked for Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, and he was the host. Wu is a privacy advocate. He says Facebook needs to clean up its reputation, prove to users the company wants to protect them - by bringing in a Patriot Act architect.

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Timothy Wu Julius Silver Professor of Law, Science and Technology
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By John C. Coffee Jr.
The SEC and Elon Musk need to reach a settlement fast. Although Musk continues to trip over his oversized ego and sense of his own infallibility, the SEC is facing its own serious problem: Can it still enforce the consent decrees that it relies upon to make companies and executives comply with its settlements?

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John C. Coffee, Jr. Adolf A. Berle Professor of Law
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By Tim Wu
Mass privacy is the freedom to act without being watched and thus in a sense, to be who we really are — not who we want others to think we are. At stake, then, is something akin to the soul.

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Timothy Wu Julius Silver Professor of Law, Science and Technology
April 01, 2019 The Nation

Infinite Frontier

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By Jedediah Britton-Purdy
Since the literal frontier closed more than a century ago, the conceit of limitlessness has served to justify expanding America’s borders into first a worldwide military empire and then commercial globalization.

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Jedediah S. Purdy William S. Beinecke Professor of Law