Outline and Boxes on a Blue Blackground

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If the race for powerful A.I. is indeed a race among civilizations for control of the future, the United States and European nations should be spending at least 50 times the amount they do on public funding of basic A.I. research. 

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Timothy Wu Julius Silver Professor of Law, Science and Technology
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Columbia Law School professor Elizabeth Emens calls this work "life admin," and wrote a book about it by the same name. "Life admin is all the invisible office work that steals our time," Emens explains. "It's the kind of work that managers and secretaries get paid in an office to do but that we all do invisibly, and for free, in our own lives."

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Elizabeth F. Emens Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law
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By Tim Wu
Cynicism in the face of pious corporate proclamations can be healthy. But there is increasing reason to think that the virtuous corporation is not an oxymoron but a necessity.

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Timothy Wu Julius Silver Professor of Law, Science and Technology
September 09, 2019 The Nation

A Shared Place

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By Jedediah Britton-Purdy
The global hypercapitalism that Berry denounces has involved life—human and otherwise—in a world-historical gamble concerning the effects of indefinite growth, innovation, and competition. Most of us are not the gamblers; we are the stakes. He reminds us that this gamble repeats an old pattern of mistakes and crimes: hubris and conquest, the idea that the world is here for human convenience, and the willingness of the powerful to take as much as they can.

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Jedediah S. Purdy William S. Beinecke Professor of Law
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By Katharina Pistor
The Business Roundtable, an association of CEOs in the US, announced this month that the era of primacy is over for shareholders' interests. Remarkably, this is less because of the content but because it reveals the mindset of corporate leaders. Apparently, the American CEOs believe that they can freely decide who they serve. But they are agents - not clients. Ergo, this decision is not theirs.


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Katharina Pistor Edwin B. Parker Professor of Comparative Law
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By Katharina Pistor
The fact that American CEOs think they can choose their own masters attests not just to their own sense of entitlement, but also to the state of corporate America, where power over globe-spanning business empires is concentrated in the hands of just a few men (and far fewer women). . . . By capturing the process to which they owe their own positions, American CEOs have made a mockery of shareholder control.

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Katharina Pistor Edwin B. Parker Professor of Comparative Law