The statue of Pegasus outside Jerome Greene Hall

Human Rights Internship Program (HRIP)

Founded in 1984 by Professor Jack Greenberg, the Human Rights Internship Program provides first- and second-year J.D. candidates with the opportunity for intensive experiential learning in international human rights legal practice abroad.

HRIP graduates have gone on to become leading human rights lawyers across the globe and play key roles in a wide range of social justice efforts, including drafting the South African Constitution, documenting human rights abuses of gay and lesbian youth in U.S. prisons, establishing international criminal tribunals, helping write a Freedom of Information Act for Guatemala, and working to improve environmental law in Hungary. On the domestic front, HRIP alumni lead community economic development efforts, head legal services offices, fight against employment discrimination, and defend death row inmates.

Program Goals

  • Educate students about human rights law
  • Help students work in the service of their beliefs
  • Create relationships to advance students’ professional development
  • Connect human rights activists within the Law School
  • Build a worldwide network of Columbia graduates and host agency advocates devoted to human rights

Watch our in-depth video about HRIP to learn more about the program. 

How to Register

  • Register for Guaranteed Summer Funding. Registration opens October 8 and closes November 30, 2019.
  • Submit a Statement of Interest form by Monday, November 30, 2019 at 3 p.m. to the Human Rights Internship Program job post via Symplicity.

Once you complete these tasks, you will be provisionally enrolled in the program. You must also complete a 20-hour training and orientation program.

For more information about requirements, expectations, benefits, and timelines, read the 2019-2020 Human Rights Internship Program Guide.

Stipend: $7,350 (10-week commitment) / round trip plane ticket / emergency evacuation insurance

“Experiencing firsthand the difficulties of the poor and marginalized only reinforced my commitment to public service.”

CLS Human Rights Intern