Philip Hamburger

Maurice & Hilda Friedman Professor of Law

Philip Hamburger

Philip
Hamburger
Maurice & Hilda Friedman Professor of Law

Philip Hamburger is the Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. He is a leading scholar of constitutional law and its history, who works on many topics, including religious liberty, freedom of speech, academic censorship, judicial review, the office and duty of judges, administrative power, and the early development of liberal thought. His books are Separation of Church and State, Harvard, 2002; Law and Judicial Duty, Harvard, 2008; and Is Administrative Law Unlawful?, Chicago, 2014.

Before coming to the Law School, Hamburger was the John P. Wilson Professor at the University of Chicago Law School, where he was the director of the Bigelow Program and the director of the Legal History Program. Earlier, he was the Oswald Symyster Colclough Research Professor at George Washington University Law School and a professor at the University of Connecticut Law School.

He has been a visiting professor at the University of Virginia Law School and at Northwestern Law School, where he was the Jack N. Pritzker Distinguished Visiting Professor of Law. Earlier, he practiced law in Philadelphia, specializing in business and corporate tax.

Courses
Advanced Constitutional Law: Religious Liberty
Constitutional Law
Contracts
S. Constitutional Ideas of the Founding Era
S. Constitutional Ideas of the Founding Period
S. Legal Theory Workshop
S. Survey of American Legal History, 1620-1870

Columbia Law School

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