Persily on Nevada Court Ruling About Las Vegas Caucus Sites

COLUMBIA LAW EXPERT SPEAKS ON NEVADA COURT RULING WHICH REJECTS CHALLENGE TO LAS VEGAS CAUCUS SITES
 
Press contact:
James O’Neill 212-854-1584  Cell: 646-596-2935
 
January 17, 2008 (NEW YORK) – Columbia Law School Professor Nathaniel Persily, an expert on election law, can speak with journalists about decision by the district court in Nevada to reject the challenge to various Las Vegas caucus sites.
 
 Nathaniel Persily, Professor of Law, can be reached on his cell at 917-570-3223 or at [email protected].
 
`` The decision by the district court in Nevada to reject the challenge to various Las Vegas caucus sites relies on established precedent concerning a political party's autonomy to decide how to nominate its candidates,’’ Persily said.
 
``Yesterday the U.S. Supreme Court sided with a similar argument made on behalf of the system for choosing party nominees for judgeships in New York, and last month a court in Florida sided with the DNC in its decision to strip Florida Democrats of any representation at the Democratic convention as a result of their early primary,’’ Persily said. ``Despite political parties' significant and unique power, courts have been largely reluctant to rein them in or to allow state laws to do so.’’ 
 
Nathaniel Persily, an expert on voting rights, election law, constitutional law, and American politics, has been a court-appointed expert for redistricting cases in Georgia, Maryland and New York, and has served as an expert witness or outside counsel in similar cases in California and Florida. He has an upcoming book on the Supreme Court.
 
Columbia Law School, founded in 1858, stands at the forefront of legal education and of the law in a global society. Columbia Law School joins traditional strengths in international and comparative law, constitutional law, administrative law, business law and human rights law with pioneering work in the areas of intellectual property, digital technology, sexuality and gender, and criminal law.
 
Back to latest news at Columbia Law