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February 2011

  Law School Teams Advance to Finals of Jessup and European Law Moot Court Competitions   
Two Law School teams have advanced to the finals of the world’s largest international moot court competitions, the Philip C. Jessup International Moot Court Competition and the European Law Moot Court Competition.
  
  Columbia Journal of Race and Law Makes Debut   
The Columbia Journal of Race and Law launched this week, at a time when the “post-racialism” heralded after the election of President Obama has yet to be realized, according to the journal’s editor-in-chief.
  
  Vale Center Releases Two E-Books on Foreign Direct Investment and Multinational Enterprises   
The Vale Columbia Center on Sustainable International Investment has released two e-books on foreign direct investment and multinational enterprises in emerging markets.
  
  Model Wind Energy Ordinance for Municipalities Drafted by Center for Climate Change Law   
The Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School has drafted a model ordinance that municipalities in New York can use to regulate the construction of wind energy systems. The ordinance would govern all new commercial wind energy facilities and includes provisions regarding permits, approvals, oversight, and operations.
  
  Medal for Excellence Awarded to Max W. Berger ’71 and Stephen H. Case ’68   
On Friday, Feb. 4, 2011, two esteemed graduates will be awarded the Medal for Excellence, the Law School’s highest honor. Max W. Berger ’71 is a renowned civil litigator and the founding partner of Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann. Stephen H. Case ’68 is the managing director and general counsel of Emerald Development Managers, a venture capital and private equity firm. The awards will be presented during the Law School’s Winter Luncheon, which will begin at noon in the Grand Ballroom of The Waldorf=Astoria (301 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y.).
  
  Professor Tim Wu Named Advisor to Federal Trade Commission on Consumer Protection, Competition   
Columbia Law School Professor Tim Wu has been named senior advisor to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for consumer protection and competition issues that affect the Internet and mobile markets.
  
  Reducing Corporate Tax a Key to Getting Economy in Order, Says Professor Michael Graetz   
The $14 trillion national debt pales in comparison to what may lie ahead, says Professor Michael Graetz. He said left unchecked, the debt could balloon to $20 trillion in nine years. “This really threatens the U.S. standard of living, it threatens the dollar as a world currency.”
  
  Obama Administration Says Defense of Marriage Act is Unconstitutional   
The Obama administration said today that it would not defend in court the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), the 15-year-old federal law that defines marriage as between a man and a woman. The Justice Department had previously defended the law, but said it had determined in a pair of cases in the federal appeals court in New York that it was no longer constitutional.
  
  New Columbia Law Review Administrative Board Named   
  
  Looking Beyond the Google Settlement: How to Best Manage the Rights of Authors and Publishers   
The Google settlement calls for creation of a Book Rights Registry, which would license authors’ rights to digitize books and make them available, unless an author opts out. The registry, a form of a collective management organization (CMO), would make licensing more cost-effective and eliminate the need to seek copyright clearance on a work-by-work basis. Even if the settlement is not approved, some people argue that Congress should create a copyright exception or a compulsory license to enable the creation of a digital library, with a CMO to represent authors’ and publishers’ interests. How CMOs work and whether they are the best solution for the large-scale exploitation of copyrighted works was the topic Jat the annual symposium of the Kernochan Center for Law, Media, and the Arts at Columbia Law School.
  
  Columbia to Host National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition   
When it comes to laws governing Native Americans, there are often many more questions than answers. Tribal, state, and federal government regulations often get entangled when trying to sort out who has jurisdiction over what. Out of such complexity comes opportunity, in the form of a tricky question that is the basis of this year’s National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition, which will be held Feb. 25-26 at Columbia Law School.
  
  Max Berger ’71 and Stephen Case ’68 Receive Medal for Excellence   
Columbia Law School awarded its highest honor, the Medal for Excellence, to Max W. Berger ’71 and Stephen H. Case ’68. The presentation took place during the annual Winter Luncheon on Friday, Feb. 4 at the Waldorf=Astoria, where nearly 400 guests celebrated the honorees’ distinguished careers, as well as their longtime commitment to the Law School.
  
  Human Rights Institute to Address Gender Justice in the Americas at Major Conference   
The Human Rights Institute (HRI) of Columbia Law School will co-host a groundbreaking conference on gender, sexuality and women’s rights issues that will bring together leading scholars and advocates from over 20 countries in North, South, Central America and the Caribbean.
  
  Columbia Journal of Race and Law Makes Debut   
The Columbia Journal of Race and Law launched this week, at a time when the “post-racialism” heralded after the election of President Obama has yet to be realized, according to the journal’s editor-in-chief.