Weinstein and Buchman Receive Alumni Medals

Judge Weinstein has served as a distinguished jurist on the federal bench for more than 45 years.

Fall 2013

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Jack B. Weinstein ’48, a U.S. District Court Judge for the Eastern District of New York, was recently awarded an Alumni Medal from the Columbia Alumni Association. Weinstein, one of 10 Columbia graduates who received this year’s medal, was honored by Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger ’71 during the University’s 2013 Commencement exercises this past May.

First awarded in 1933, the Alumni Medal recognizes graduates for their distinguished service to Columbia University’s schools, alumni associations, regional clubs, and University-wide initiatives. 
Weinstein, who served as a member of the Columbia Law School faculty for several decades, was recognized for his outstanding volunteer work on behalf of the University. He is a former director of the Columbia Law School Alumni Association, as well as a former member of the Law School’s Board of Visitors. Weinstein was honored alongside fellow Law School graduate Stephen L. Buchman ’62 LL.B., who serves as ombudsman and attorney adviser at Chadbourne & Parke, and as assistant director of career advising at the Law School. 

Weinstein was appointed to the federal bench by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967. During the past 46 years, he has presided over thousands of cases and has set many of the country’s mass torts precedents. Weinstein served as chief judge at the Eastern District from 1980 to 1988, and he now maintains a full caseload as a senior judge. He is a past recipient of the Columbia Law School Medal for Excellence and the Law School’s Lawrence A. Wien Prize for Social Responsibility.

This year’s Alumni Medal winners will be recognized again in October at the Columbia Alumni Association Leaders Assembly Gala, which will be held during the Columbia Alumni Leaders Weekend.

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Jack B. Weinstein