Shaun Ossei-Owusu

Postdoctoral Research Scholar; Kellis E. Parker Teaching Fellow

Shaun Ossei-Owusu

Shaun
Ossei-Owusu
Postdoctoral Research Scholar; Kellis E. Parker Teaching Fellow

Shaun Ossei-Owusu is an Academic Fellow at Columbia Law School. He studies social inequality and his work sits at the intersection of law, history, and sociology. His research coheres around an interest in how government provides services to the poor, specifically legal aid and health care. His manuscript, which is based on his dissertation, explores the development of criminal legal aid and its unexamined relationship to racial inequality. He also studies how interface of federal legislation, municipal politics, and post-Great Society health care restructuring have impacted urban hospitals and the communities that they serve. 

Before coming to Columbia, Ossei-Owusu received his J.D. and Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley, where his work was supported the National Science Foundation, the American Bar Foundation, the American Society of Criminology and the American Society for Legal History. He has worked as a Pro Bono Fellow at Whitman Walker Health in Washington D.C. and as a teacher in North Philadelphia. His work has appeared in various scholarly and public outlets.

Areas of Expertise
  • Criminal Law and Procedure 
  • Race, Class, and Gender 
  • Health Law and Poverty 
  • Constitutional Law 
  • Civil Rights 
Publications

“Racial Horizons and Empirical Landscapes in the Post-ACA World” in Wisconsin Law Review, 2016.

“A People’s History of Legal Aid: A Brief Sketch” in Routledge Handbook on Poverty in the United States, Routledge, 2014.