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September

September 1 - September 30

 
 
CNN/KazakhstanNews.net September 1
By Nathaniel Persily (linked from CNN)
In the space of two weeks, two different courts have come to two different results in evaluating the legality of two similar voter identification laws.
 
NEWSgrist September 3
... appellate court judges, Barrington Parker, compared the injunction to “something that would appeal to, you know, Huns or the Taliban.” In fact, according to Columbia University law professor Philippa Loengard, it's “very unlikely” that the judges will uphold the lower court's decision in its entirety....
 
The Sacramento Bee September 9
In its latest issue, the Columbia Human Rights Law Review makes a convincing case that Texas executed an innocent man in 1989. The executed man was Carlos DeLuna. The crime for which he was convicted and executed – fatally stabbing a convenience store clerk named Wanda Lopez with a buck knife during a robbery in Corpus Christi in 1983 – was more likely committed by a man named Carlos Hernandez, the Columbia law review concludes.
 
The New York Times September 10
"It doesn't mean he can tell them how to decide, but it does mean they must consult with him - and that is the minimum required for the single executive the Constitution created," said Peter L. Strauss, the former general counsel of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission who is now a professor of regulatory law at Columbia Law School. He added that he hoped "the bill will be enacted."
 
KWTV-TV September 10
... Counsel, ASTM International Esa Sferra-Bonistalli, Senior Attorney, U.S. Coast Guard Clark Silcox, General Counsel, NEMA Peter Strauss, Professor, Columbia Law School Rachel Weintraub, Director of Product Safety and Senior Counsel, Consumer Federation of America ANSI members and all...
 
American National Standards Institute September 10
... Counsel, ASTM International Esa Sferra-Bonistalli, Senior Attorney, U.S. Coast Guard Clark Silcox, General Counsel, NEMA Peter Strauss, Professor, Columbia Law School Rachel Weintraub, Director of Product Safety and Senior Counsel, Consumer Federation of America ANSI members and all...
 
The Nation – September 12
By Patricia J. Williams
“My friend G. lives on Martha’s Vineyard, an island with a complex social order. During the winter it is among the poorest districts in Massachusetts, but in the summer it vies for position as one of the richest. The year-round population is largely working-class; the summer folk are well-off, and their numbers include more than a few celebrities.”
 
The Sacramento Bee September 13
... of color. As we noted in the first installment of this series, there is strong evidence that in 1989 Texas executed a man who may have been innocent, Carlos DeLuna. In California, judges are nonpartisan and avoid partisan activities.
 
The New Times September 13
...He was exonerated in March. But Carrillo told a New Times reporter that it's a case from Texas that gives him pause. In 1989, a young Hispanic man, Carlos DeLuna, was executed for a crime which evidence-later uncovered by students at the Columbia Human Rights Law Review some two decades...
 
MIT News Office September 14
...whether feminism was a match for black women and the need to act together and in support of others such as Asian women. Panel members included Angela Davis, Kimberle Crenshaw of University of California in Santa Cruz, Gina Dent of Columbia and Wahneema Lubiano of Princeton.
 
Journal of Turkish Weekly – September 15
The U.S. government’s “entire response to 2008 suggests this could happen again someday,” said John Coffee, a professor at Columbia Law School in New York and a prominent expert on securities law and white collar crime.
 
Bloomberg September 16
In the U.S., most software contracts forbid resale, and there haven’t been any decisive challenges to such clauses in court, said Eben Moglen, a Columbia Law School professor and founder of the Software Freedom Law Center.
The Oregonian September 17
 
... the United States, most software contracts forbid resale, and there haven't been any decisive challenges to such clauses in court, said Eben Moglen, a Columbia Law School professor and founder of the Software Freedom Law Center.
 
Intrepid Report September 17
... least as important, as the donors themselves, because someone who is able to bundle half a million dollars together has influence," Richard Briffault, a Columbia Law School professor, told the Globe.
 
The Washington Post September 17
... the forefront, The Washington Post reported. “Notice that Google has more power over this than either the Egyptian or the U.S. government,” Tim Wu, a Columbia University law professor, told The Post.
 
Detroit News September 17
In the U.S., most software contracts forbid resale, and there haven't been any decisive challenges to such clauses in court, said Eben Moglen, a Columbia Law School professor and founder of the Software Freedom Law Center.
 
UPI.com September 17
... least as important, as the donors themselves, because someone who is able to bundle half a million dollars together has influence," Richard Briffault, a Columbia Law School professor, told the Globe.
 
Treasury and Risk September 17
... Aachen. In the U.S., most software contracts forbid resale, and there haven't been any decisive challenges to such clauses in court, said Eben Moglen, a Columbia Law School professor and founder of the Software Freedom Law Center.
 
Hindustan Times September 17
... have said. "Notice that Google has more power over this than either the Egyptian or the US government," the Sydney Morning Herald quoted Tim Wu, a Columbia University law professor, as saying.
 
Boston.com September 18
...as the donors themselves, because someone who is able to bundle half a million dollars together has influence,'' said Richard Briffault, a professor at Columbia Law School. By law, Romney and other candidates have to reveal only the names of bundlers who are lobbyists.
 
The Huffington Post September 18
... of parties and will have to explain why it sees censorship as the right solution in some cases but not in others," she writes for CNN. According to Columbia Law School professor Tim Wu, in yanking the video, "Google's content-removal process left much to be desired."
 
Wichita Eagle September 19
...Thus, most tax experts say the Romney plan is a mirage. “You can't get enough base-broadening to finance his rate reductions,” said Michael Graetz, a Columbia Law School professor who was a top tax official in President George H.W. Bush's Treasury Department.
 
New York Lawyer September 19
By John C. Coffee Jr.
In his Corporate Securities column, John C. Coffee Jr., the Adolf A. Berle Professor of Law at Columbia University Law School and Director of its Center on Corporate Governance, focus on two aspects of the Standard Chartered affair, which is fading too quickly from public attention: (1) What will be the impact of continuing competition among financial regulators?, and (2) How is license revocation, as an enforcement tool, different from the tools that enforcement divisions have traditionally used?
 
The New Republic September 20
... unlikely to reverse that trend on their own. “Over the long run, [Apple's victories] probably mean nothing” says Harold Edgar, a patent specialist at Columbia law school. Google says it has already programmed around Apple's design patents.
 
Santa Maria Sun September 20
...there," Carrillo said. He was exonerated in March. But Carrillo said that it's a case from Texas that gives him pause. In 1989, a young Hispanic man, Carlos DeLuna, was executed for a crime which evidence-later uncovered by students at the Columbia Human Rights Law Review some two decades...
 
Tom Nelson September 20
... www.eenews.net "California is becoming the second primary node for climate litigation," said Michael Gerrard, director of the Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School. "Previously, it was mostly in Washington."
 
Politicaldog101.com September 20
... courts to carry it's money making club….. “Over the long run, [Apple's victories] probably mean nothing” says Harold Edgar, a patent specialist at Columbia Law School. Google says it has already programmed around Apple's design patents.
 
Land Letter September 20
... home of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Photo by Lawrence Hurley. "California is becoming the second primary node for climate litigation," said Michael Gerrard, director of the Center for Climate Change Law at Columbia Law School. "Previously, it was mostly in Washington."
 
The Huffington Post – September 20
By Erez Aloni
“Recently, we heard the good news that France and Scotland are about to legalize same-sex marriage. Beyond the obvious lessons about the importance of this step, there is another significant lesson for the U.S. from these two countries' experience.”
 
Individual.com – September 21
... Detractors say the law will disenfranchise an untold number of voters without proper ID, especially the poor, elderly and minorities Election-law expert Nathaniel Persily isn't convinced the county ID campaign will get many takers -- "unless, of course, a high-schooler might be able to buy beer as...
 
Pittsburgh Tribune Review-September 21
...Detractors say the law will disenfranchise an untold number of voters without proper ID, especially the poor, elderly and minorities Election-law expert Nathaniel Persily isn't convinced the county ID campaign will get many takers " "unless, of course, a high-schooler might be able to buy beer as a...
(A similar article appeared in the Valley News Dispatch.)
 
Express-Times Bethlehem Edition-September 22
... has been seeking to hold a community discussion on the topic ever since. On Oct. 11, that discussion is scheduled to happen with the assistance of Columbia Law School Professor Mark Barenberg.
 
Orange County Register September 23
... awakening to the need for some scrutiny or oversight or public attention to the decisions of the most powerful private speech controllers,” said Tim Wu, a Columbia University law professor who briefly advised the Obama administration on consumer-protection regulations online.
 
The Journal Gazette September 23
... the United States, most software contracts forbid resale, and there haven't been any decisive challenges to such clauses in court, said Eben Moglen, a Columbia Law School professor and founder of the Software Freedom Law Center.
 
Eweek September 24
... Maybe there was never separation of church and state in this digital realm, but there certainly never will be. On a more serious note, Tim Wu, the Columbia Law School professor, summed up the state of affairs among the tech giants when he told the New York Times : There was a time when...
 
The New Republic by The New Republic September 24
...unlikely to reverse that trend on their own. "Over the long run, (Apple's victories) probably mean nothing," says Harold Edgar, a patent specialist at Columbia Law School.
 
New York Times Deal Book September 24
“The court has given tremendous power to business groups, causing the agencies to operate out of fear,” said Harvey Goldschmid, a law professor at Columbia and a former S.E.C. commissioner.
 
News-Sentinel September 24
BLOG: Opening Arguments: Fire!
... awakening to the need for some scrutiny or oversight or public attention to the decisions of the most powerful private speech controllers," said Tim Wu, a Columbia University law professor who briefly advised the Obama administration on consumer protection regulations online.
 
The Ottawa Citizen September 25
... Germany. In the U.S., most software contracts forbid resale, and there haven't been any decisive challenges to such clauses in court, said Eben Moglen, a Columbia Law School professor and founder of the Software Freedom Law Center.
 
The Wall Street Journal September 25
"IPOs are the most attractive kind of suit for the plaintiff's bar," said John Coffee, a law professor at Columbia University.
(This appeared in other outlets as well)
 
Tweaktown.com September 26
... firms who sold shares of Facebook for the IPO.     "IPOs are the most attractive kind of suit for the plaintiff's bar," said John Coffee, a law professor at Columbia University. Coffee estimates that at least one-third are thrown out, but many of the rest conclude in settlements...
 
El Colombiano – September 26
El experto en seguridad nacional de la Escuela de Leyes de Columbia, Matthew Waxman,explicó a EL COLOMBIANO el alcance de las palabras de Obama como un intento de “usar la amenaza de una posible acción militar para apoyar la diplomacia” más que una alternativa a los canales políticos.
 
The New York Times September 27
Matthew Waxman, a law professor at Columbia and former Defense Department official, said speaking openly about cyberwarfare policy was important because it allowed the United States to make clear its intentions on a novel and fast-emerging form of conflict.
(This appeared in other outlets as well.)
 
RIA Novosti September 27
... that would be of great interest to U.S. criminal authorities,” said John Coffee, a prominent securities law expert at Columbia Law School.
 
International Herald Tribune September 28
U.S. officials open up on cyberwarfare
...law of war prohibits the use of "new weapons" altogether and, if not, how the law governs their use in "each particular operation." Matthew Waxman, a law professor at Columbia University in New York and former Defense Department official, said speaking openly about cyberwarfare policy was...
 
OUPblog – September 28
By Andrea Campbell and Nathaniel Persily
“The Supreme Court’s decision in National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius achieved a level of media coverage and public salience reached by very few Supreme Court decisions.”
 
The Indian Express – September 28
By Lisa Sachs, Jacky Mandelbaum and Perrine Toledano
“In light of the recent boom in natural resource prices, India is one of many countries facing heightened scrutiny of the allocation and terms of their resource deals.”
 
Nightly Business Report – September 28
John Coffee, Professor, Columbia Law School:  If investors get any sense that there might be a failure, they’ll all race for the exit.  And that’s the equivalent of a run on the bank and there is no one there—no one with capital like a parent or the FDIC to supply capital if there’s that kind of race for the exit. 
 
The AM Law Litigation Daily September 28
"I have the highest respect for Wachtell," said Columbia Law School professor John Coffee Jr. "But you have problems when you're defending advice you gave the client."
 
Institutional Investor September 28
Jeffrey Gordon, co-director of the Center for Law and Economic Studies at Columbia Law School, told FD that Calabria's proposal, which he called “private insurance with some capital to control moral hazard,” is unlikely...
 
The New York Times Sunday Review – September 30
By Michael Sovern
“When Walter F. Mondale, the Democratic nominee for president in 1984, asked me to help him prepare for his debates with President Ronald Reagan by playing the Reagan role, I accepted with enthusiasm.”
 
WIRED September 29
It’s one of many conclusions in new report on the covert, robotic air war that doesn’t fit neatly into the dominant narratives about the drone campaign, pro or con. (The report is due to publish at midnight GMT on Sunday.) Using interviews with dozens of people in northwest Pakistan — one of theepicenters of unmanned air assaults — The Center for Civilians in Conflict and Columbia Law School’s human rights clinic have crafted a nuanced view of the civilian impact of this most controversial component of the Obama administration’s counterterror efforts. Table your preconceived notions about the drone war before you read — starting with the notions about who the drones are actually taking out.
 
 
The Bureau of Investigation Journalism September 30
In The Civilian Impact of Drones: Unexamined Costs, Unanswered Questions, experts from Columbia Law School and the Center for Civilians in Conflict examine the impact of the US ‘war on terror’ on the lives of civilian Pakistanis, Yemenis and Somalis caught in the crossfire. The report’s publication marks the anniversary of the assassination of US citizen Anwar al-Awlaki by a US drone in Yemen.
 


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