Whose Justice? Reframing the International Criminal Court's Trial of Dominic Ongwen [Session II]

Monday, March 20th, 2017 @ 6:00pm to @ 9:00pm
International Affairs Building, Room 1501
Mar 20
Monday, March 20th, 2017 @ 6:00pm to @ 9:00pm
International Affairs Building, Room 1501

On December 6, 2016, the International Criminal Court (ICC) commenced its trial of Dominic Ongwen, a former top-ranking commander in the infamous Ugandan rebel group known as the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA).

The discussion will grapple with the moral and legal ambiguities of Ongwen's standing as a former child soldier, while also interrogating the merits of international versus local justice mechanisms in a case like Ongwen’s.

Topics of discussion will include the following: Does international transitional justice in a case like Ongwen's serve the victims, or sideline them, while prioritizing optics and Western geopolitics? Would it have been in the interest of LRA-affected communities to consider either “traditional” justice measures or Ugandan law over ICC prosecution? By failing to address UPDF (the Ugandan national military, which also committed heinous acts of violence against civilians during the LRA conflict) crimes, has the ICC legitimized government violence and allowed itself to be used as a tool of victors' justice in Uganda?

Please join us for the amazing opportunity to discuss with Harvard Law's Alex Whiting, Mark Drumbl of Washington and Lee Law School, and author Opiyo Oloya. The panel will also include Stephen Lamony of Amnesty International, and Ketty Anyeko (currently doing her PhD at the University of British Columbia, but formerly of the northern-Uganda-based Justice and Reconciliation Project, and translator of "I Am Evelyn Amony").

Contact Info: 
Nana Agyeman Taylor, nt2435@columbia.edu